Tag: ideas

Knowing God’s Will

Knowing God’s Will

The major part of my professional and vocational life right now is the teaching I do online. This teaching includes a number of subjects from basic Bible survey courses to graduate courses in practical ministry. Whatever the level of learning among my students, there is one question I am asked more frequently than any other: “How can I know the will of God for my life?” For some this is very general, but for others it may have to do with their specific calling into vocational ministry. Here are some thoughts I have on discerning the will of God.

Our first and most consistent guide to God’s will is of course God’s word. The Bible is our primary source for knowing what God has revealed to humanity. What is more, God will never contradict himself, so anything which is contrary to the Scripture cannot and will not be God’s will for us. Of course, my assumption and belief is that the Bible is God’s word and authoritative for the life of the believer. If one does not accept such authority from Scripture, then this guide will be meaningless. However, for the believer, our faith in  the written word of God must lead us to trust his guidance there.

A second way to determine God’s will is to ask a different question: What is God doing in the world and how do I participate in it? This is the question which led me to initially work in Haiti. Many things since have confirmed my choice, but by looking at Haiti seeing what God was doing and how I could participate in it has been the major determinant in how I perceived God’s will for me.

A third way we can discern God’s will is what I call the “open door guidance.” If God wants you to move in a certain direction, he will open doors for you towards that goal. However, this cannot be blind movement. We must also ask, “who is opening this door?” “Should I walk through this door, at this time?” Open doors can be helpful but they are also like the signs Gideon sought: they can be ambiguous and unreliable.

One of the fourth ways to discern God’s will is to practice humility and calmness. As I write this my own heart wants to say, “What do you mean, ‘humility and calmness? This decision is disrupting my whole life! How can I be humble and calm?” Marva Dawn (2000) claims, “God’s purposes will fulfilled whether you participate or not, but perhaps this is exactly why you are in the position you are in” (p. 171). By cultivating the humility that God does not need me, yet God still calls me, we are more likely to understand his calling and our free choice in the process. What is more, we are more likely to sense the moving of God in calmness (Be still and know that I am God), than if we are constantly worried, anxious, or excited. This attitude points to a willingness to be patient in the meantime. As we wait for God’s leading to become clear, we can avoid panic and through patience and prayer we can wait on God/

Finally, one of the most often neglected means for discerning God’s will is within the counsel of the faith community. The Christian life is distinctly communal and when we try to determine God’s will in isolation from others, then we are missing the most important element, next to the Bible, in determining God’s will and purpose. Sometimes it is because the saints know us better than we know ourselves. Sometimes it is because they want what is best for us and can perceive this “best” when we cannot. At other times, the questions and input offered by the community help us think and act more clearly in decisive moments.

So, we should seek to know God’s will through all these methods. But above all, we need to follow God in obedience and joy.

God is on the Move!

God is on the Move!

Got some pictures this morning on Facebook. The Clinic project in Bayonnais Haiti is literally off the ground! The foundation stones and footers have been laid out and poured (see photos) and construction is moving ahead very quickly. Funds are in place and teams are coordinating with local workers to complete the building. This is truly Good News!

As I have worked on the history of ICDM, I have had the chance to hear about children meeting under the trees for their classes and how gradually new buildings were added. Today, we have the Center for Hope, the Guest House, the dining hall, the church sanctuary, and a staff housing building. Now, the new Clinic is going up across the road from the school. This one clinic will provide daily access to health care, midwifery, eye care, and dental care for a rural community that is an hour away from the nearest health care and hospitals. This is a critical part of community development, providing quality healthcare for people who currently have little or no access to such care.

However, this is more than merely a healthcare facility for the locals! In addition to the care of nurses, physicians, and other professionals, this clinic is also to become a training ground for Haitian nurses and doctors. By partnering with physicians and nurses from other parts of the world we can train indigenous doctors and nurses with advanced skills and techniques. Such partnerships also build the community in a truly international sense.

Want to do something crazy? Why not come to Haiti and help us build the Clinic! Skill is not necessary! Just a desire to see God’s work move forward and to be a personal part of all God is doing!

Listen and Learn

My father used to always tell me that I did not listen! He was right! My attention was almost always somewhere else. But as I have matured I have learned the value of really listening! It is not always easy, but it is always worthwhile.

First, you have to still your own thoughts and focus on the other person or persons. I cannot be planning my answer and listening to the other’s thoughts at the same time. Usually my mind is so prepared to answer that I cannot hear. But when I push aside my own need to answer, I find that my ears and mind can pay more attention to what the other person is trying to say. I also find that I am more attentive to the contextual clues in their communication, body language and tone of voice. This has become especially important in my communication in Haiti because of the language barrier. When I am speaking with another through an interpreter, I find I must be attentive to both the speaker and the translator.

Second, I need to enter every conversation with the expectation that the other person has something to teach me. Whether it is a deep spiritual truth or just a detail of their life, they have something to give me if I will slow down long enough to receive it. This is where I think social media has spoiled us. We no longer spend time in conversation, we only throw words at each other. In one of the online classes I teach we experienced this text-based communication problem just this week. I said something to one student, but she heard something completely different. She then communicated what she thought I said to another student who went complaining to his advisor that I was giving them two different directions for the assignment! Because so many communication clues were missing a small misunderstanding became a big one very quickly. Real conversation takes time and effort. We must commit ourselves to the process and put aside distractions if we are to listen and learn.

And third, we need to weigh our words and temper our attitudes. Something else my dad taught me was to “count to ten” before responding in anger. Anger is not the only emotion that can hinder our listening. Communication requires us to trust one another with the ideas and thoughts we are sharing. If these ideas or worse our words are shared through our wounds, hurts, negative expectations, or anger, then communication ceases. If we allow words to trigger the worst of our emotions, then we stop communicating and end up only venting our emotions.

Dad, if you are paying attention to what I am doing now, I want you to see, I am learning to listen, so maybe I will listen and learn!

2018 Pastor’s Conference

2018 Pastor’s Conference

On January 9, I returned from an amazing event! The annual ICDM Pastor’s Conference had convened the previous week and I was more than impressed by the outcome. Three things in particular caught my attention. The first were the growing relationships I experienced. Relationships between myself and a number of Haitian leaders, but also the relationships I witnessed between these leaders. Coming from all over the nation of Haiti, these men and women gathered for days of learning, inspiration, and encouragement. And that is just what they experienced! But most of all friendships were built and strengthened! Abraham Vilsaint, Jean-Noel Preval, Nanette Pierre, Chiff, Gina, and many more! I have learned to love them and to listen to their stories. Each year my friendships grow with them and I feel that much more a part of their ministries and mission.

The second thing I witnessed at this year’s conference was the sense of purpose and hope among the participants. Pastors and leaders in Haiti often face challenges that leaders in the USA can barely comprehend. More than being preachers and teachers, they are often community developers, activists and advocates, and business leaders as well. Yet, in spite of the challenges, they are joyful! Whether it is n our worship together or just conversations in the courtyard, there conversation and communication is permeated with joy! These men and women see the reality of Haiti as it is now, but they also have a vision of change and transformation. This hope, deeply grounded in the Christian gospel or Good News, shapes their work, inspires their efforts, and energizes their creativity. And their joy is also contagious! No matter what is happening in my life and ministry, I always come away from these meetings with a new outlook! Energy renewed, vision expanded, and heart inspired, I come back to the USA stronger and more joyful!

Finally, I think this year’s conference came at a critical time for both the leaders of the sessions and the participants. While the conference was going on, ICDM was working on a home for a family in Bayonnais. Right after the conference a team from New Jersey came and finished up this construction. Construction on ICDM’s new clinic is getting started. A record number of children are enrolled in the school. New leaders are being trained and commissioned. All of these things seem to bring a sense of strength and possibility to everyone’s mind. It is as if the entire mission has reached a point of great momentum. As each new idea becomes a reality it sparks more new ideas, inspires new leaders to take charge of these initiatives, and these in turn spark even more ideas and visions. Such momentum is awesome to observe! It is even more powerful when you are even a small part of such momentum!

For anyone who reads my thoughts posted here, I invite you again to visit this wonderful country with me! Post your interest here and I will send you more detailed information.

Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned

My adventure with Haiti has been spread over many years, most of them before I ever bothered to visit the country itself. When he was in first grade, my son Hunter raised money on his own to support the Church of God orphanage, the House of Blessing, in Petionville, Haiti. This was the start of my friendship with the nation and people of Haiti. Along the way I have learned some important lessons and I am sure I will continue to learn with each trip (by the way, this is one of the most important reasons for short-term mission trips: learning!). Here are a few lessons that came to my attention as I prepared our Haitian dinner last night at church.

First, God will send you helpers of all kinds. Welcome them, accept anything they can do. Then celebrate with them the accomplishments. As I began cooking yesterday, one of my wife’s teacher friends asked if she could help. All afternoon her and my wife helped me cook, chop peppers, onions, and mushrooms, and then get all the food to the church and the tables setup for dinner. Stephanie is a young teacher who made friends with my wife last year at the school where they both taught. She has come to be as close to me as a sister and although I did not expect her help yesterday, I think God sent her to be there when the work would have probably overwhelmed me. When I visited Haiti several weeks ago, I met some people who had simply been available at the right time when Yvan Pierre needed them. In any ministry, but especially in mission work, the ability to build a team from those who are available rather than those who are qualified is essential!

Second, real ministry is a relational and community event, not the work of just one person. Even when one person is the visionary and the leader of what happens, they are powerless to create anything meaningful. Partners are essential! Not just workers and far more than mere supporters. Partners capture the vision of what is going on and can discern their own contribution to that larger vision. The shared contributions of many people make the ministry or mission far more successful than one-man shows or single focus programs.

Third, sometimes the discernment of a call is not a single datable event, like God calling Samuel, but more of a progressive unfolding of God’s will for you. I think God usually has to work this second route with me! If he had showed me at 16 what I know now, I would have probably run like Jonah!Instead, God has led me step by step into my current ministry. My current ministry activity is thrilling in both the emotional and spiritual sense, it is challenging in so many ways! Only my life experience has prepared me for these challenges. So I have learned to be faithful wherever I find myself in ministry and not only perform well in that position, but also look for what God might be trying to teach me through the phases of my life.

On my most recent visit to Haiti, I spent a lot of mornings and evenings in prayer. One thing God revealed to me is that my essential calling is still to be a pastor. Although now I am more of a pastor to pastors, the nature of what I am and what I do is unchanged from my initial calling. With this in mind, I am learning to not only submit to God’s leading but also to submit to the human leaders he places in my life. God has sent me “Apostles” who can expose me to new pastoral opportunities and help me discern specific tasks. Just as I trust God, I must trust that in placing me under the authority of these individuals, he is placing me right where I need to be to accomplish his will through me.

Missions and Partners

From the very first time I spoke with Yvan Pierre about International Christian Development Missions, he talked about “partnering with ICDM.” I thought I understood his idea until I began working more closely with him in the mission. Having just returned from eight days in Bayonnais, I think I am finally understanding what Yvan really means. On this most recent trip, I got to sit down and talk with Yvan about his history and the vision God gave him. To see the way God used Yvan and spoke to him through the years is itself a wonderful experience. However, the things that come through almost every sentence he shared with me are the names of people who “partnered” with him and made the present mission possible. What was special about this narrative was the fact that this was not so much about partners and supporters here in the USA, but about the people of Haiti who helped him, guided him as he planned and worked, and opened doors when they needed to be opened. Yvan even spoke of the many people he had met across Haiti who helped him accomplish what God had called him to do in Bayonnais.

I even got to meet one of these early partners, Francois! This distinguished man was one of the first if not the first person to whom Yvan shared his dream and vision. Because of the influence God had given Francois in the community, the Institute Henri Christophe, our primary school, was able to open its doors to the children of Bayonnais. Francois himself has a wonderful testimony of how God led him to faith. As we sat and he shared his story with me, hos humility and graciousness were clear. He was so amazed at all God had done through the years without bragging the least about how God had used him, Francois, to make it all happen.

We also had a big visiting team there the first few days. Business men and women, housewives, and even some teen ladies. There partnership was profound both in terms of the contribution they made to our projects but also what they experienced on this trip. But they also became my friend!

What I learned from all this is that missions is not about one person or group traveling to another country and doing something for or to others. Rather, real missions is about building relationships with people and working together to bring to life a vision that is bigger than all of us could imagine. When we get to know people and when we see in them the gifts and calling of God, we can then work with them in creative and powerful ways. Partnership means relationship, and Christian missions must first of all be relational!

Waiting for IRMA!

Hurricane Irma has swept across the Atlantic Ocean and taken dead aim for the Caribbean islands and eventually Florida. As I sit in my home in North Florida and watch all the new reports, I have to keep in mind all my friends in Haiti. Most of the folks have little access to the news. No TV in the living room and very few radios. News travels by word of mouth and, at best, over telephone contacts and connections. By contrast I have news alerts on every station and at least five dedicated TV channels that seem to be covering nothing but Hurricane Irma.

We are setting up one of our church buildings to be an evacuation site for those who have to leave, or want to leave, home for the storm. We have civil servants all set to manage the evacuations, shelters, and the recovery afterwards. Haiti has little if any of these services. People must survive on their own, or at best in their communities.

I am proud that ICDM has been preparing for this kind of situation from the very beginning. With strong buildings, they have a place for people to stay. With do it yourself technologies they are better equipped to feed people, clothe people, and provide for their immediate needs. But they can only do this much because of you! As you prepare for the Irma, be thinking of those who lack the resources and civil service you will depend on! Lift them up in your prayers, be ready to help them out as they recover, and provide what you can for their present and ongoing needs.

http://www.icdm.us